Weekly outline

  • General



    Welcome to Mr. Toohey's English 10 honors class!

    ptoohey@avhsd.org


    Thesis + 3 Topic Sentences are >> HERE << .


    Your thesis statements from last week are >> HERE << .


    For additional reading log sheets, >> CLICK HERE << .


    To submit a book to the spreadsheet for acceptance,

    go to GOOGLE CLASSROOM.


    For restrictions on which books you may choose, > > CLICK HERE < < .


    LINK: ZZI.SH website for practice vocabulary quizzes.

    The code for your class is pbh4798.


    LINK: Brainstorming topics for research paper >> CLICK HERE <<.


    LATE WORK: To make sure I get to your late assignments,

    submit the information >>HERE<< .

    Note: this is ONLY for electronic assignments submitted to

    Google Classroom.


    Check back >>HERE<< for feedback on these late items.

  • 13 August - 19 August

    MONDAY:

    Overview of class;

    For classroom expectations, see box above;

    For course change requests, go here --> www.tinyurl.com/qhhsschedulechange

    TUESDAY:

    Notes on syntax and semantics (see PowerPoint listed below);

    Discuss: Current List of Banned Words and Phrases (from Moodle);

    Homework: Banned Words and Phrases (the list is posted in the "welcome" box at the top of this page; the homework is listed below); 

    NOTE: sentences are below, but they are in Microsoft word form. If it will not open for you, CLICK HERE FOR A GOOGLE DOCUMENT. 

    WEDNESDAY:

    review yesterday's practice sentences.

    And a few more:

     

    6. We talk to eachother nearly everyday.

     

    7. The magician did this thing pulling a rabbit out of his hat.

     

    8. He was late because his car wasn’t running.


    THURSDAY:

    >Summer reading test #1: Life of Pi

    FRIDAY:

    Summer reading test #2: Into Thin Air;

    Due Monday:

    In many ways, Life of Pi discusses religion, whether because the novel is overtly about religion, or merely uses religion as a vehicle to teach or suggest other ideas or concepts.

    Select one of the passages listed below, both from chapter 4. Think about how either passage is really talking about more than just a zoo. Make a case that Yann Martel, through Pi, is discussing religion in metaphor.

    Cite specific examples from the text, explaining their dual meanings, and draw an inference of what the message might be in a larger sense.

    Passages to choose from in chapter 4:

    1.        Paragraphs 6-8: from “I have heard nearly as much nonsense…” to paragraph ending with “all this because a stork is not standing where it usually stands!”

    2.      Paragraphs 11-12: from “Don’t we say, ‘There’s no place like home’?” to “Under such conditions of diplomatic peace…”


    .

    ==================================================================================

    Handouts for the week:
  • 20 August - 26 August

    Monday:

    Begin discussion of Life of Pi -- bring your books

    • Discuss homework from Friday

    In class: Group work. In pairs you have been assigned a section of the first part of the book ("Toronto and Pondicherry"). With your section, exampne and present the following to the class:

    • Summary
    • Important quote, discussed
    • Connect to something else in the book
    • What does it mean? You read what happens in the story (denotation). So, what does it mean (connotation)?

    We will try to get through a few groups today; groups who do not present today in class will go tomorrow.


    Tuesday:

    >Finish off presentations from yesterday.


    Wednesday:

    >Life of Pi -- the Zoo.

    “Dry, yeastless factuality”

    Choose an animal mentioned in Life of Pi. For variety, you may not choose a tiger, and it should be an animal found in a zoo, so not cats, dogs, or goldfish. Chapter 8 has many different animals listed, so that would be a good place to start (although other chapters list animals, too).

    Then, list what you know of that animal right now, without doing any research. Think of as many characteristics of that animal as you can: on which continents it can be found, in what environments, whether it lives a solitary life or whether it travels in groups, what it eats, and many other topics.

    After you have written down whatever prior knowledge you have of the animal, begin investigating the animal with research. Look up and see whether or not you were right about that animal. Gather as much information as you can about that animal. 

    Next, get into groups of three, with each member of your group researching a different animal. Design a zoo. Plan out how you would map out where animals go, finding and explaining the logic to your pattern. Think of other things beyond just animal enclosures that would necessarily be in a zoo, and include those. This is not an invitation to look up a real zoo and copy its layout. Use your own logic and knowledge rather than copying what has already been done. 

    Your group will present your findings – the animals and the zoos – to the class in a format you feel comfortable in. This will be due Monday, August 21.


    Thursday:

    >Animal papers collected, returned.

    Then, on the handout you got yesterday (the text of which is listed in yesterday's box), get into groups and finish the directions (last 2 paragraphs). This will be due Monday.

    Focus on presentation and research

    for the presentation -- remember the things I told you about in class:

    • No mere shoulder-to-shoulder
    • No mere reading to audience
    • Face the audience
    • No “wall of words”
    • Engage your audience



    Friday:

    >Interpret Chapter 100 in Life of Pi. This is due in class today.

    Then, you may have the remainder of class to work in groups. Remember, creating a Google Doc (or slide show, etc) and "sharing" it with everyone in your group is a good way to have access and better coordinate your presentation.



    Don't do this yet:

    Active and Passive Voice (see notes below);

    Practice sentences done in class (below);

    Homework (below) -- Do this worksheet as homework and turn in tomorrow. 

    You may print the paper (which might be easier) or write your answers on a separate sheet of paper. 

    For any passive voice sentence, rewrite into active voice. If the sentence is already active voice, 

    no need to rewrite.

    For GoogleDocs version of homework assignment:   >>CLICK HERE<<

    + + + + + + + 

    Don't do this:

    Written assignment, due Monday -- submit to Google Classroom:

    Read the quote which heads chapter 9 of Into Thin Air. Think about what it says. 

    Look up words you do not know, if necessary.

    Then, look at how that applies to both of your summer reading assignments, Into Thin Air and Life of Pi. 

    Write a paper of appropriate length explaining how the idea of the quote applies to both novels. 

    Papers are to be turned in to Google Classroom. I do not want hard copies.

    Most of you are enrolled already in my class. If you are not, here are the codes necessary to enroll:

    ==================================================================================

    Handouts for the week:

  • 27 August - 2 September

    Monday:

    Begin class presentations -- zoos.

    >RI testing, part 1.

    Notes, quiz (both on Google Classroom) on active and passive voice.

    Tuesday:

    Class presentations;

    Wednesday:

    Review active / passive voice.

    Handout (see below, or  >> CLICK HERE << for google doc. (not uploaded yet).

    >> HERE IS THE PARAGRAPH <<   to rewrite.  <-- Don't do this yet.

    Thursday:

    >Review Active/passive voice;

    Discussion on Climbing Everest;

    Debatable Issue:


    Climbing Mt. Everest is inherently dangerous -- inherently deadly, you might say. But it is not illegal, and the climbers are all aware that the mountain is deadly. Should people have the right to do something that is inherently and imminently deadly if the only risk they take is to themselves? Does your opinion change if the danger extends to others beyond the climber himself or herself? Write up some pros and cons and then choose after you have looked over your own list. How might you counter-argue your pros? Your cons?

    Use examples from Into Thin Air to support your position, but feel free to use other useful examples as they come to mind.



    Friday:

    >Images from Everest (discussion) -- see below;

    ==================================================================================

    Handouts for the week:
  • 3 September - 9 September

    MONDAY:

    >No school today -- Labor Day.

    TUESDAY:

    >In groups of 2:

    Imagine you were Rob Hall, and you had lived through the storm and made it back to camp 4 – and later, home —safely, but Doug still had died on the mountain.

    Create a skit in which Hall meets Doug Hansen’s girlfriend (or family). Hall is there to explain what happened to Doug.

    Create a factually accurate (as best we can tell from what Krakauer and/or science tells us) dialogue of a possible, truthful explanation Rob Hall might give.

    This should be a dialogue, though, not a Rob Hall monologue, so think of what the family might say in response. Certainly they would have questions for Hall, and would certainly want answers. What might some of those questions be? Is the girlfriend/family understanding? Angry? Do they blame Hall? Do they blame Doug?

    Type a dialogue onto a Google Document and share it with your teacher (and make sure both of your names are on it). This will be the dialogue you will perform in class. Each member of the group will be expected to contribute equally. This is due Friday, Sept. 7.


    WEDNESDAY:

    >

    Changing 2nd person to 3rd person: rewrite the following sentences into 3rd person by eliminating "you." Look for ways to reconstruct the sentence; avoid merely replacing "you" with some other word.

    1. You will need to set aside several months if you decide to climb Mt. Everest.
    2. If you need a new laptop computer, you will need to do some research before you make your purchase.
    3. When you write an academic paper, keep in mind that the appearance of your paper can make a positive or negative impression on your reader.
    4. Whenever you go to the grocery store it seems like you always are stuck in the longest line.
    5. You should leave your cell phone in your backpack if you want to resist the temptation to use it while you are in class.


    THURSDAY:

    >

    FRIDAY:

    >Hall/Hansen skits due today; 

    Writing assignment, due Tuesday:

    See the intro quote to Ch. 21 of Into Thin Air. On your own instead of in groups, read that quote over and discuss what it means (it's pretty straight forward) and discuss how that idea applies not only to Ch. 21, but to the entire story. 

    Paper can be typed (double-spaced) or hand-written. Be thorough. We will be finished with Into Thin Air at this point.


    ==================================================================================

    Handouts for the week:
  • 10 September - 16 September

    MONDAY:

    Handout: Edit paper from "Student X." Discuss some of the problems; find and fix in first paragraph: passive voice, 1st/2nd person.

    More presentations;



    TUESDAY:

    >Finish presentations;

    Review Into Thin Air Ch. 21 leading quote (homework from last Friday);

    Your assignment:

    Rewrite on a separate sheet of paper the following paragraph in active voice. You will first need to identify what the verb is for each sentence; then, decide whether or not the subject is doing the action implied by it. You may need to reword the sentence completely to change it to active voice. Be careful to change pronouns (when necessary) from their objective form (him, for example) to their subjective form (he) when changing them from the predicate to becoming the subject.

         The convention was attended by my friends and me. There, we were met by many company executives. Several companies were given time to showcase their businesses, and an audience to showcase them to. At that convention, much was learned about commerce. Many of us were given fliers and other materials for later reading. I was told nearly fifty companies were represented at this convention. Several friends of mine have been asked back to the next one. They were invited back to be given interviews by various representatives of the companies. It was an interesting experience.


    Not this, not yet:





    WEDNESDAY:

    >More passive/active voice work


    THURSDAY:

    >review yesterday's handout;

    Some preliminary discussion of Shakespeare / A Midsummer Night's Dream

    Group assignments (I have put you in groups, listed below):



    FRIDAY:

    >

    ==================================================================================

    Handouts for the week:
  • 17 September - 23 September

    MONDAY:      

    BRING IDs: Check out A Midsummer Night's Dream from library

    Sentence variety review from last Friday;


    TUESDAY: 

    >




    WEDNESDAY: 

    >No School -- student-free day

    THURSDAY: 

    Discuss Act I scene 1 in A Midsummer Night's Dream;

    Read scene 2 for tomorrow

    FRIDAY:

    Homework:

    Read AMND Act II, sc. i;

    Choose one line* that you find significant and come ready to discuss its importance.

     

    *-- line might be a single line, a couple of lines, or a full line of dialogue spoken by ONE character


    ==================================================================================

    Handouts for the week:

  • 24 September - 30 September

    MONDAY:

    Have Act 2 sc. 1 read for today -- see assignment from last Friday;

    TUESDAY:

    >

    WEDNESDAY:

    >

    THURSDAY:

    >



    FRIDAY:

    >

    ==================================================================================

    Handouts for the week:
  • 1 October - 7 October

    Monday:

    >To library to check out A Midsummer Night's Dream;

    Review "The Secret Life of Walter Mitty" and questions assigned last Friday;

    Assign: Read Act I, sc. i in A Midsummer Night's Dream, due this Friday;

    Tuesday:

    >Mr. Cassady will be coming by to speak to you about the International Baccalaureate (IB) program here at QH. If you have any questions about the program, Mr. Cassady is the person to ask.

    Google Slides

    Wednesday:

    >Student presentations: tips for Google Slides (see some below);


    Thursday:

    A Midsummer Night's Dream pre-reading presentations; For every group these are due today. Please make every effort to be here to present.

    Friday:

    More presentations (if needed);

    Assign: Act I, sc. i in AMND due Monday; Act I sc. ii due Tuesday;

    On Reading Shakespeare (PowerPoint -- see below);


    ==================================================================================

    Handouts for the week:
  • 8 October - 14 October

    MONDAY:

    > More PSAT study;

    > Finish movie;

    > AMND Extra Credit Assignment -- due Monday, Oct. 15  >> CLICK HERE <<   for assignment.

    > Essay topics -- choose one, due this Friday, Oct. 12.  >> CLICK HERE <<  for essay topics.


    TUESDAY:

    >Need from you today: write out which (if any) extra credit part you will do;

    >Need from you today: commit to an essay prompt and give me a suitable thesis that addresses the prompt.

    > Quick review of thesis statements

    > Enroll in Turnitin.com. 

    • Class ID: 19367071
    • Enrollment key (password): period4   <-- note, no capitals, no space.


    WEDNESDAY:

    >PSAT -- report to your period 2 class, or wherever you were told to go. 

    THURSDAY:

    >Thesis statements;

    > MLA format;

    FRIDAY:

    >Essays due today -- make sure the paper is submitted to Turnitin.com.  Hard copy is still due in class!


    ==================================================================================

    Handouts for the week:

  • 15 October - 21 October

    MONDAY: 

    > Extra Credit presentations:  >> CLICK HERE <<  to see presenters;

    > Papers due today (moved from last Friday) -- make sure they are submitted to Turnitin.com. THIS IS A REQUIREMENT.

    > Parallel Structure --  >> NOTES HERE << . Notes include in-class assignment.

    Homework: Fix the parallel structure issues in the following sentences:

    1. Either you will begin to study now or risk failing the exam.

    2. Billy’s motivation to succeed in this program seems to be greater than his sister.

    3. Each room is fully carpeted, air conditioned, padded chairs, and a speaker's podium.

    4. Sally was excited about inviting friends over to play cards, and eating a good meal, and then they will socialize.

    5. When the weather outside is cold and getting to be windy, I like to be indoors.


    TUESDAY: 

    >Review yesterday's sentences;  

    New sentences to work on in class:


    Assignment, due tomorrow: using proper parallel structure, ...

    1.  Create a sentence about Into Thin Air using parallel structure and comprised of a list of 4 items that are single words (but may contain modifiers).
    2. Create a sentence about Life of Pi using parallel structure and comprised of a list of 3 items that are phrases.
    3. Create a sentence about A Midsummer Night’s Dream using parallel structure and comprised of a list of 2 items that are clauses.



    WEDNESDAY: 

    >Review sentences from yesterday;

    Visit from Mr. Cassady to pitch the IB program to you.

    Sentences to work on:

    Identify how many items are on the list. Then write out the list items (only; not the full sentences) and circle or otherwise highlight the element that is parallel.

    Example: You can be successful as a lawyer by working hard, reading the latest court cases, staying up-to-date on laws and regulations, and giving a lot of time to your clients.

      • working hard
      • reading the latest court cases
      • staying up-to-date on laws and regulations
      • giving a lot of time to your clients


    Your sentences:

    1. One by one, like sheep in a dream, they passed through the hedgerow, crossed quietly over a meadow and came down to the rice paddy.
    2. The twenty-six men were very quiet: some of them excited by the adventure, some of them afraid, some of them exhausted from the long night march, some of them looking forward to reaching the sea where they would be safe.
    3. But he was afraid, for it was his first night at the war, so he hurried to catch up, stumbling once, scraping his knee, groping as though blind; his boots sank into the thick paddy water and he smelled it all around him.
    4. His fear now was diffuse and unformed: ghosts in the tree line, nighttime fears of a child, a boogieman in the closet.
    5. He would learn their names and laugh at their jokes.



    THURSDAY: 

    >More parallel structure: First two sentences below have parallel structure errors. Fix them. The second two are directions for you to create your own parallel structure sentences. 

    1. After losing his glasses, Tom drove down the wrong side of the street, ran a stop sign and two red lights.
    2. The dictionary can be used for these purposes: to find word meanings, pronunciations, correct spellings, and looking up irregular verbs.
    3. Create your own: Write a compound-complex sentence that uses parallel structure. Highlight the parallel structure.
    4. Create your own: Write a sentence using P.S. that incorporates a list, but where the items are not the beginning list item.


    FRIDAY:

    >Quick review of yesterday's assignment;

    Quick parallel structure quiz;

    THEN...

    Rewrite the following paragraph into active voice.

     Last summer our house was painted by me. The job took about two weeks. First, the exterior was washed using warm water and a mild detergent. Then all the chinks and pores in the walls were sealed with putty. After the putty had had a chance to dry, the exterior could be painted. A latex paint was used because it is easy to apply and cleans up with water. A whole week was needed to finish this part of the job. I was very careful to apply the paint evenly because I did not want to have to apply two coats. A color was used that was very close to the original color. Our house is a two-story house, which meant that a tall ladder was needed to do the second story. The paint can had to be balanced on the top rung of the ladder while I worked. When the job was finished, a great deal of satisfaction was felt by me. I had to pat myself on the back. Even my dad said that a good job was done.


    ==================================================================================

    Handouts for the week:
  • 22 October - 28 October

    MONDAY:

    >


    TUESDAY:

    >Review passive voice rewrites from last Friday;

    Passive voice review QUIZ: Google Classroom     SEE RESULTS  >> HERE << .


    WEDNESDAY:

    >STUDENT-FREE DAY -- NO SCHOOL


    THURSDAY:

    >The Gettysburg Address -- handout below.

    Then, find on your own a famous historical speech. Read the speech and find examples of parallel structure. Write them down on a separate sheet of paper. Read the speech over a few times. Write out in a paragraph of maybe 7-8 sentences what you find the parallel structure adds to the speech. Add in what else you find effective about the speech in terms of other rhetorical devices (like parallel structure). Research to see what other rhetorical devices exist.

    Bring in a copy of the speech and be prepared to read it in class (or an excerpt, if the speech is long; use the Gettysburg Address as a guide -- make your excerpt be approximately as long as the Gettysburg Address). After reading it, walk the class through the parallel structure you find, and other rhetorical devices you find in the speech.


    FRIDAY:

    >Speeches from yesterday; present these to class.


    ==================================================================================

    Handouts for the week:

  • 29 October - 4 November

    MONDAY:

    >Writing sample: "The Story of an Hour" 


    TUESDAY:

    > Finish presentations from last Friday;

    >Modifiers powerpoint (see below);

    > A word or two on CLAUSES (link)



    WEDNESDAY:

    >Finish notes from yesterday;

    A few practice sentences:

    THURSDAY:

    > Fix these:

    1. To please the neighbors, some fireworks were set off a day early.

    2. Though only sixteen years old, the college accepted Martha's application.

    3. Climbing up the ladder carefully, the frightened cat was brought down from the tree.

    4. After a quick change into my hospital gown, the nurse told me to relax.

    5. Before replacing any wall outlet, the electricity should be turned off.

    6. Vegetables are an important part of your culinary repertoire. To be cooked well, you must steam vegetables.

    7. Having laid an egg weighing two pounds, the farmer proudly displayed his favorite ostrich before the photographers.

    8. Flossing your teeth daily, gum disease can be prevented.

    9. Before engaging in strenuous aerobic exercise, warm-up activities are necessary.

    10. The policemen finally stopped the criminal using pepper spray and handcuffs.


    Then,  >> DO THIS <<.   :: SCORES for this are released; written response scores HERE



    FRIDAY:

    >

    ==================================================================================

    Handouts for the week:

  • 5 November - 11 November

    MONDAY:

    > Check out The Catcher in the Rye;


    TUESDAY:

    >Some brief discussion questions;

    > time in class to read


    WEDNESDAY:

    >

    “A & P,” by John Updike -- read story and answer the following questions:

    1. What characteristics of American society in the years leading up to the date of publication of the story (1960) are represented here? How does Sammy feel about contemporary societal values?

    2. How/why does Sammy contrast his family parties with what he imagines about the parties of Queenie’s family?

    3. Which specific words (diction) most indicate Sammy’s state of mind?

    4. How do the customers in the supermarket react to the appearance of Queenie and her friends? How does the manager Lengel react to them? How do the other employees react to them?

    5. Why does Sammy quit his job? Does he hope to gain anything by doing so?

    6. Explain the last sentence of the story. What tone does he seem to be taking?

    7. Is Sammy a totally reliable narrator, or is there some irony directed at him by the author?


    THURSDAY:

    >Narrative Voice -- comparing Holden to Sammie of John Updike's "A & P."  Handout below.

    FRIDAY:

    >The Catcher in the Rye -- Chapters 1-3 are due today. Handout below. Due today.


    ==================================================================================

    Handouts for the week:
  • 12 November - 18 November

    MONDAY:

    No school -- Veterans' Day



    TUESDAY:

    > CITR, Chapters 4-7, due today. Handout below.


    WEDNESDAY:

    > > READ THIS < <  in class: "The Unreliable Narrator."

    Then, respond to the following:

    Find 3 examples in The Catcher in the Rye where Holden comes across as unreliable. Write down the quote and explain what it shows about him. Due tomorrow. NOTE: Find where Holden is unreliable to US, the audience, not just lying to another character within the story. Do not use examples we may have discussed in class. Use any parts of chapters 1-7.


    THURSDAY:

    >

    FRIDAY:

    >CITR, Chapters 8-12, due today.

    CITR questions, chapters 8-12:

    1. According to Holden, why was Ernest Morrow not elected president of the class?
    2. What is Holden’s explanation for going home on Saturday?
    3. What does Holden discuss with the cab driver on the way to the Edmont Hotel?
    4. Why does Holden not call Jane Gallagher?
    5. Who is Phoebe? How does Holden feel about Phoebe?
    6. How does Holden know that the three girls at the next table are not from New York City?
    7. How did Jane Gallagher and Holden get to be friends?
    8. What was it that made Jane Gallagher cry when she and Holden were playing checkers?
    9. Who is Ernie? What does Holden find especially irritating about Ernie?
    10. What does Holden discuss with Horwitz?
    11. How does Holden characterize the patrons at Ernie’s?

    Then: 

    Choose one of the following and write a brief paragraph about it. Be prepared to discuss it with the class today.

    1.  Chapter 10 – Holden very often refers to Phoebe as “old Phoebe.” What might be some reasons he refers to her that way, given that she is Holden’s younger sister.

    2.  Chapter 11 – We learn the story of Jane Gallagher. Given what Holden tells us of her, why do you think he views her so caringly/ Why do you think he is always thinking about her but never calls her, or is never “in the mood” to call her?

    3.  Chapter 12 – Holden elaborates on the recurring issue of the ducks to Horwitz, one of his cab drivers. What can you see in this elaborated discussion of the ducks? Why do you think Holden is fixated on them, or what might Salinger be suggesting, about Holden or a theme of the book, with this fixation?


    READ!!! -- Chapters 13-20 due Monday after the break. 




    ==================================================================================

    Handouts for the week:

  • 19 November - 25 November

    THANKSGIVING WEEK: No school



    POET PRESENTATION DATES:

    See below for poet, poem, and date of presentation. If you have any questions, ask immediately upon return to school on Monday, November 28. I will not issue any last-minute change of plans. If there is a mistake, let me know ASAP via email. I will check it periodically over the Thanksgiving break. I will not do any last-minute changes, though. You had plenty of time to square this all away before now. For some of you I had to assign poems since you never gave me a title.

    If the spreadsheet document will not open for you, contact a friend, or contact me. No excuses for not being ready on your assigned date. Check, double-check, and triple-check your scheduled date so that you are ready on time!


  • 26 November - 2 December

    MONDAY:

    The Catcher in the Rye -- Chapters 13-20 due today!!

    Class discussion

    In groups of 3 (or less fewer if numbers require), discuss one of the following NUMBERED topics (the bolded topics I will talk about first to everyone):


    * Who is Holden talking to?

    * Unreliable narrator

    * What do these say about Holden, or how do they help us understand Salinger’s message?

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------

    1. (13) p. 90 – brief booze; + p. 93 – prostitute, nonchalant, nervous wreck

    2. (14) p. 98 – Allie, bicycles, Jesus, disciples

    3. (14) p. 103 – “shot,” movies

    4. (15) p. 108 – Dick Slagle and suitcases

    5. (15) p. 111 – Nuns, Romeo & Juliet

    6. (16) p. 115 – family with boy – 1st “catcher”

    7. (16) p. 120 – museum

    8. (17) p. 130 – Sally, future plans

    9. (18) p. 139 – movies & mean mommie

    10. (19) p. 148 – Carl Luce and psychoanalysis

    11. (20) p. 155 – Holden’s funeral; Allie’s grave


    You will talk about these with the class.



    TUESDAY:

    >Finish discussion questions from Monday.



    WEDNESDAY:

    “The Patterns of Your Mind”

    Discussion:

    When Holden is visiting with Carl Luce, he says that his father is a psychoanalyst

    and can help him to “recognize the patterns of his mind.” What does this mean?

    Was Holden asking for Carl Luce’s company because he was lonely, or was there an

    ulterior motive?

    Journal:

    Pretend you are a psychoanalyst and Holden has come in for an appointment.

    Write down the notes you would take to help Holden “recognize the patterns of his

    mind.” Be sure to include what you think the patterns of Holden’s mind actually are.



    THURSDAY:


    > 2018: PRESENTATION in Library -- put on by counselors, so I have no idea if this is all period or not.


    FRIDAY:

    > The Catcher in the Rye Chapters 21-22 due tomorrow. 








    Disregard what is below. I don't want to delete this yet, but you don't have to do it.



    >POEMS due today -- you gave me the poet for your presentation; now I need the poem you will be reviewing for the presentation. Due in class today.

    > HOMEWORK:

    These two poem assignments:


    These are BOTH due Monday, November 27 (That's the day we get back from Thanksgiving break!)



    Not yet:

    POET PRESENTATION DATES:

    See below for poet, poem, and date of presentation. If you have any questions, ask immediately upon 

    return to school on Monday, November 28. I will not issue any last-minute change of plans. 

    If there is a mistake, let me know ASAP via email. I will check it periodically over the Thanksgiving break. 

    I will not do any last-minute changes, though. You had plenty of time to square this all away before now. 

    For some of you I had to assign poems since you never gave me a title.

    If the spreadsheet document will not open for you, contact a friend, or contact me. 

    No excuses for not being ready on your assigned date. Check, double-check, and triple-check 

    your scheduled date so that you are ready on time!

    ==================================================================================

    Handouts for the week:
  • 3 December - 9 December

    MONDAY:

    >



    TUESDAY:

    >



    WEDNESDAY:

    >



    THURSDAY:

    >


    FRIDAY:

    Review of passive voice, pronoun misuse, and modifier problems;

    > Review: Parallel structure (see powerpoint notes below);

    > Homework: below are 5 sentences with parallel structure errors. Fix. In the interest of keeping the focus on parallel structure, you may leave be the other issues in the sentence (passive, banned words, etc.).

      1. Billy’s motivation to succeed in this program seems to be greater than his sister.
      2. The sentence is difficult to understand not because the vocabulary is technical but because of faulty syntax.
      3. The dictionary can be used for these purposes: to find word meanings, pronunciations, correct spellings, and looking up irregular verbs.
      4. The victims of this illness have sore throats, a fever, and their heads ache.
      5. Before the barbecue, you should ignite some charcoal, have bought some steaks, and you should be preparing some marinade.


    ==================================================================================

    Handouts for the week:

  • 10 December - 16 December

    MONDAY:

    Catcher in the Rye Art Assignment

    1. Create an actual photo album that might be owned by Holden. Be creative! Use the book as a reference and try to recreate the scenes (the lagoon, the park, his dorm, his family, his friends, etc.) Submit it in some type of binder or small photo album (even if hand-made) with the pictures labeled.

    2. Create a poster or brochure of Pencey Prep promoting the school, or design a T-shirt for Pencey Prep. Include extra-curricular activities, reputation, and other details that Holden spoke of. Re-read the first few chapters, in particular Chapter 1, and get a feel for what might be appropriate to include. What images does Holden use in describing Pencey, and what seems like Pencey’s image it promotes for itself.


    TUESDAY:

    > Indefinite pronouns and subject / verb agreement; notes (powerpoint below), handout (below), and 

    homework  > > HERE < <




    WEDNESDAY:


    THURSDAY:

    >

    Choose among the following possible answers:

         A) faulty pronoun reference

         B) Passive voice

         C) Dangling / misplaced / squinting modifier

         D) Parallel structure error

         E) No error

         F) subject / verb agreement error


    Also, practice with word derivatives:

    skeptic - noun: One who instinctively or habitually doubts, questions, or disagrees with assertions or generally accepted conclusions; skeptical - adjective; skepticism - noun

    • He had always been a _________ when it came to UFOs.
    • He was ________ about the existence of UFOs.
    • He viewed any "proof" of UFOs with a heavy dose of ________. 


    FRIDAY:

    >1. Margo and her parents (visit-visits) each other often. 

    2. Either the cups or the glass (are-is) in the dishwasher. 

    3. Vern and Fred (need-needs) a ride to work. 

    4. There (is-are) a dog, a cat, and a bird in the garage. 

    5. Neither Matt nor his brothers (was-were) at the party. 

    6. Here into the main ring of the circus (come-comes) the trained elephants. 

    7. Either the workers or the boss (deliver-delivers) the merchandise. 

    8. There (is-are) many things to do before the holidays. 

    9. Here (is-are) the nails you need for the projects. 

    10. Either Joyce or Ellen (was-were) here. 

    11. A magazine and a book (was-were) lying on the floor. 

    Extras...

    12. The United States (is-are) a country of contrast. 

    13. The committee (work-works) hard for better schools. 

    14. The jury (was-were) polled for their verdicts. 

    15. The family (is-are) occupied with their individual problems.


    STUDY SENTENCES:

    1. The answers to the math problems were provided in the back of the book.
    2. We went to the restaurant with our friend that is open all night.
    3. Each person has their own way of studying for a final.
    4. He asked for help but did not receive it.
    5. The basket included chocolates, small gifts, and there was a gift card in it, too.


    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    No extra credit at this time. -- management.

    At this time, do not begin the assignment below. It is left over from last year and is not currently assigned 

    to 2016-2017 students. I am leaving it up in case i decide to allow it as extra credit later.

    TENTATIVE: EXTRA CREDIT: Read Ohio Impromptu (below -- it is a .pdf file, so make sure you are able to 

    open this kind of file. If you cannot, it is available online -- just do a search).

    PAPERS should be a full 2 pages, not more.

    PAPERS need to be submitted to turnitin.com, and you must submit a hard copy to me by 7:30 AM Tuesday, 5/30/17. 

    No exceptions. If the hard copy is not in your teacher's possession by 7:30 AM Tuesday you will not receive extra credit. 

    No papers may be left at the switchboard or placed in my mailbox. No exceptions.

    PAPERS should be in perfect MLA format.

    Respond to ONE the following: 

    1. Discuss a theme in the play.
    2. Discuss the knocks and what purpose they serve.
    3. Discuss the pauses and what purpose they serve.
    4. Discuss how some aspect(s) of character contribute(s) to an understanding of the play.
    5. Discuss how the setting contributes to an understanding of the play.
    6. Discuss how refrain contributes to an understanding of the story.
    7. Does something in the story serve as a microcosm? Does the play itself serve as a microcosm?

    ANY PLAGIARISM WILL RECEIVE A SCORE OF ZERO. NO EXCEPTIONS.


    ==================================================================================

    Handouts for the week:
  • 17 December - 23 December

    MONDAY:

    >Review Friday's sentences;

    Choose among the following possible answers:

         A) faulty pronoun reference

         B) Passive voice

         C) Dangling / misplaced / squinting modifier

         D) Parallel structure error

         E) No error

         F) subject / verb agreement error

    STUDY SENTENCES:

      1. He told his daughter eventually the dog would have to go back to its owner.
      2. She was not only very tired, but also sick to her stomach.
      3. I noticed that a window had been left open.
      4. Neither my brothers nor my father are going to sell the house.
      5. Sally stopped at the grocery store, the bank, and ran to the library.

    TUESDAY:

    >

    Choose among the following possible answers:

         A) faulty pronoun reference

         B) Passive voice

         C) Dangling / misplaced / squinting modifier

         D) Parallel structure error

         E) No error

         F) subject / verb agreement error

    STUDY SENTENCES:

    1. Some of the water in our yards enters from a hole in the drainage pipe.
    2. I am not sure which Billy dislikes more, going to the doctor’s office or a visit to the dentist.
    3. Having a friend carefully review your work will keep errors to a minimum.
    4. Old movies were filmed in black and white.
    5. Tired after a long shift at work, watching a movie was just what I needed.
    6. Johnny told Billy he had a test on Friday.
    7. Billy likes hiking, swimming, and to ride a bicycle.
    8. Sally had been asked many times before that day.
    9. Finally turning twenty, my father let me drive his restored Mustang.
    10. To survive in this heat, new plants need daily watering.


    MORE PRACTICE: (working on it...)

    WEDNESDAY:


    FINALS: Periods 1 & 2


    THURSDAY:


    FINALS: Periods 3 & 5


    FRIDAY:


    FINALS: Periods 4 & 6


    +++ See you after the break! +++

    ==================================================================================

    Handouts for the week:


  • 24 December - 30 December

    Winter Break -- no school

  • 31 December - 6 January

    Winter Break -- no school

  • 7 January - 13 January

    Winter Break -- no school

  • 14 January - 20 January

    MONDAY:

    Article: Read "Back to Square One." Answer the following questions:

      1. Explain the premise (argument) of the article.
      2. What examples does the article incorporate?
      3. While the article does seem to present both sides, which side does the article favor? How can you tell?
      4. Do you agree or disagree with that message? Why?
      5. Cite something you think Melissa did “the right way” to try to put herself in a position for long-term success. Explain why you think this was “the right way.”
      6. Cite something you think Melissa did to hurt her chances for long-term success, or something she did that was not “the right way.”


    TUESDAY:

    Discuss the article from yesterday;

    >RESEARCH PAPER

    You will be brainstorming ideas for a research paper you will be working on in the fourth quarter. You will need a NONFICTION book on a historical event or person (there are limitations) to begin the research paper, but you don't need the book itself just yet. Think of topics you would enjoy researching. See Powerpoint below for more details, or CLICK HERE for the google version.

    To see the spreadsheet for all responses, click on your class below:

    (This will be posted later once everyone is done.)



    WEDNESDAY:

    New vocabulary assigned;

    Homework: two more sentences.

      1. Virginia told her sister that she was not going.
      2. The customer was being helped by the clerk.


    THURSDAY:

    Homework due;
    Review first semester final: 1-5 done in class;
    Orwell: "Politics and the English Language, Worksheet #1"

    Read Excerpt, then do the assignment at the bottom. The list of 20 is here so you you don't need to open the worksheet just for the list.


    1.  A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush

    2.  A day late and a dollar short

    3.  A diamond in the rough

    4.  A fish out of water

    5.  A legend in his own time [or mind!]

    6. A watched pot never boils

    7. All that glitters is not gold

    8. Back to the drawing board

    9. Barking up the wrong tree

    10. Every cloud has a silver lining

    11. Live by the sword and die by the sword

    12. Like water off a ducks back

    13. Paint the town red

    14. Paper tiger

    15. Silence is golden

    16. Take a back seat

    17. Take the wind out of your sails

    18. A bitter pill to swallow

    19. The blind leading the blind

    20. Every dog has his day




    FRIDAY:

    Review yesterday's homework;

    More S1 Final review; 

    New:

    Extended metaphors

    An extended metaphor is a comparison between two unlike things that continues throughout a series of sentences in a paragraph or lines in a poem. Also known as a conceit.

    “Bobby Holloway says my imagination is a three-hundred-ring circus. Currently I was in ring two hundred and ninety-nine, with elephants dancing and clowns cart wheeling and tigers leaping through rings of fire. The time had come to step back, leave the main tent, go buy some popcorn and a Coke, bliss out, cool down.”

    Write an extended metaphor of something that has some level of importance in your life. It might be something specific, like school or your cell phone. It might be someone specific, like a parent or a best friend. It might be an activity like reading or a sport like soccer.

    Remember, metaphors are comparisons between things that seem, on the surface, to have nothing in common. Make the extended metaphor be a paragraph in length, with as many internal comparisons you can pack into it.

    SEE BELOW for the extended metaphor we looked at in class.
    >


    ==================================================================================


  • 21 January - 27 January

    MONDAY:

    No school -- Martin Luther King, Jr. Day

    TUESDAY:

    >Final Review part 3;

    >Orwell: "Politics & the English Language, part 2" -- word etymologies

    WEDNESDAY:

    Vocabulary due today;


    THURSDAY:

    >Final Review Part 4;

    > Orwell: "Politics & the English Language, part 3" -- 


    FRIDAY:

    >


    ==================================================================================

  • 28 January - 3 February

    MONDAY:

    >"The Necklace" -- read and respond to the following in 1 to 1.5 pages. This is due in class today:


     

    TUESDAY:

    >Wall Street Journal article, and follow-up questions.


    WEDNESDAY:

    Vocabulary Quiz / new vocabulary


    THURSDAY:

    > For zzi.sh, the site to practice your vocabulary quiz, your class's code is pbh4798

    > The school has asked the teachers to give you students this survey, apparently about 5 minutes long.

    > > CLICK HERE < < for the survey.


    FRIDAY:

    >



    ==================================================================================


  • 4 February - 10 February

    MONDAY:

    >

    TUESDAY:


    WEDNESDAY:

    > Student free day -- no school


    THURSDAY:

    >


    FRIDAY:

    >



    ==================================================================================

  • 11 February - 17 February

    MONDAY:

    Review of Friday's assignment (see last week);


    TUESDAY:

    Review of last Friday's assignment (see last week):

    WEDNESDAY:

    Student-free day -- no school

    THURSDAY:

    FLEX DAY

    Vocabulary quiz; 


    FRIDAY:

    Review of CITR, chapters 24-26.

    Symbolism (see short .ppt below);

    Weekend assignment: symbolism in The Catcher in the Rye -- handout (below) and sample outline (below);

    NOTE: You may not choose the red hunting hat for your symbol, since the sample outline below does that for you!

    ==================================================================================


  • 18 February - 24 February

    MONDAY:

    Lincoln Day -- no school

    TUESDAY:

    Outlines from last Friday due today;

    At the end of the novel we know Holden is somewhere getting analyzed, but for what? Using the links below (and, of course, your text) play the psychoanalyst for a little while and come up with the correct diagnosis for Holden.

      1. Determine whether Holden is suffering from depression, bi-polar disorder, or schizophrenia. Below are links giving symptoms of each. There are some overlapping ideas, so think it through carefully. You likely will have to do some extra research to get through the symptoms (what is a "manic episode," or what is "hypomania," for example). Use sufficient examples from the book to justify your diagnosis.
      2. Identify treatment Holden requires. This also you will need to look up.

    This is due Friday. Submit to Google Classroom, with paper formatted in proper MLA format. Submit a copy to Turnitin.com. ANY plagiarism will result in a score of ZERO.


    WEDNESDAY:

    Vocabulary quiz; / new vocabulary; 


    THURSDAY:

    >Sentence variety: simple, compound, complex, and compound-complex.  >>SEE HERE<<  for slide presentation notes/examples (and make sure you are logged in to your SCHOOL Google account or you won't be able to see the slide show).

    > Edit your papers: 

      • Check to see that you have used the appropriate punctuation marks in your paper
      • work hard to eliminate all passive voice verbs, except maybe an occasional is-am-are-was-were verb that may be the best way of phrasing your sentence

     

    FRIDAY:

    >Holden's diagnosis is due today;

    Practice sentences: Determining sentence type by structure.

    Determine whether the following sentences are simple sentences, complex sentences, compound sentences, or compound-complex sentences. Answers are  >>HERE<<

      1. Although bridges are built for practical purposes, many bridges are not only useful but also beautiful.
      2. Old-fashioned covered bridges can still be seen in some parts of the country, chiefly in New England.
      3. These bridges were not intended to be objects of art, but many people today consider them very lovely.
      4. The simple lines and the weathered wood of a covered bridge go well with its rustic surroundings.
      5. Those who design modern bridges take both usefulness and beauty into account.
      6. The Brooklyn Bridge, which was opened in 1883, was one of the first steel suspension bridges in the United States.
      7. Not only was the Brooklyn Bridge the longest suspension bridge of its time, but it was also one of the most artistically pleasing.
      8. The bridge was recognized as an artistic triumph even before it was completed, and it quickly became a favorite subject for painters and photographers.
      9. Many suspension bridges built during the twentieth century employ structural principles that were developed by the designer of the Brooklyn Bridge.
      10. Two of the best-known suspension bridges of recent times are San Francisco’s Golden Gate Bridge and New York’s Verrazzano-Narrows Bridge.


    Then, go to Google Classroom to take your quiz when you are ready. You may use your notes, but you may not work together.


    Enjoy your long weekend!


    ==================================================================================

  • 25 February - 3 March

    MONDAY:

    >

    TUESDAY:

    >



    WEDNESDAY:

    Vocabulary quiz / new vocabulary;


    THURSDAY:

    >

    FRIDAY:

    > > CLICK HERE < <  for your book approvals. Green means "good." Yellow means that I have some concern about it; see the notes in the farthest-right column to see what my concerns are. If I don't tell you that you need further approval for a yellow, and if you are OK with what concerns I raise, then a "yellow" book is OK. Red means you cannot do that book. You can look in the "notes" column to see the problems.

    ==================================================================================

  • 4 March - 9 March

    MONDAY:

    >Counselors here to discuss registration for next year;

    TUESDAY:

    >Sentence types: simple, compound, complex, and compound-complex;

    Homework assignment on Google Classroom


    WEDNESDAY:

    University of Michigan survey; this will take most of the period;

    2019 Book Approval list  >> CLICK HERE <<

    THURSDAY:

    Flex Day

    > Vocabulary quiz / new vocabulary

    > Reading logs discussed;



    FRIDAY:

    To library to complete registration for next year; 

    Friday Assignment:  >>GO HERE<<  and select a topic . . .

    Write a brief creative writing piece on ANY of the topics listed on the link above. Feel free to interpret 

    the topic in whatever way suits your creativity best! It might be a complete story done in one page, 

    or a segment, like parts of a television show appearing between commercial breaks. Just be creative! 

    Oh, and of course include at least one COMPLEX SENTENCE, at least one COMPOUND SENTENCE, 

    and at least one COMPOUND-COMPLEX SENTENCE. You may have more than one of any of them, 

    but select one of each, underline it, and label it. So, your finished product should have 3 (and only 3) 

    sentences underlined.


    ==================================================================================

  • 11 March - 17 March

    MONDAY:


    Read excerpt from Into Thin Air; discuss finding research topics within your research book;

    Example: 

    Into Thin Air was a book about a specific disaster on Mount Everest in 1996. If you were reading Into Thin Air you would NOT be writing a research paper about the disaster Krakauer writes about in his book. You would find something in the reading -- a TANGENTIAL idea -- to focus on for your research paper, such as "Effects of oxygen depletion on the body," "High altitude rescue practices and difficulties," "How storms develop," "Evolution of mountaineering equipment over time," etc. None of these are identical to Krakauer's book, but his book discusses them to some degree and would serve as a source for writing that kind of paper.


    Also, discussion of READING LOGS you need to keep for your research book. Remember, the journals are your PROOF that you have done the reading, so do them as well as possible. You got a handout of page one for the reading logs in class today. For subsequent pages, you will need to print them yourself. See below (for Microsoft Excel spreadsheet) or look in Friday's box for a Google Sheets version.


    TUESDAY:

    >

    WEDNESDAY:

    Vocabulary quiz / new vocabulary

    THURSDAY:

    >


    FRIDAY:

    EarlyBird deadline for book-in-hand: this is the LAST day to get BONUS points for having your approved book in class. You can still get full credit (but no extra credit) for having your book in hand on Monday after Spring Break (3/25/19).

    >> CLICK HERE <<  for Google Sheet version of your reading log. Feel free to print double copies and have them back-to-back, if that works better for you.

    Maybe: FIND OUT -- on Chromebooks. In-class activity. First 10 people finished -- with all correct answers, correctly spelled -- get bonus +10 points.

    =======================================================================================

    Handouts for the week:

  • 18 March - 24 March

    .

    .

    .

    .


    Spring Break. -- no school

    .

    .

    .

    .

  • 25 March - 31 March

    MONDAY:

    Reading nonfiction (see .ppt below);


    TUESDAY:

    >Inference: reading what isn't said -- goes with "The Far Side" cartoon with Santa Claus / venison, and the Kyrgyzstan article. These are in-class supplements.


    WEDNESDAY:

    Vocabulary quiz / new vocabulary


    THURSDAY: 

    >


    FRIDAY:

    >Reading Journal Check #1 -- have your logs here today!

    ==================================================================================

  • 1 April - 7 April

    Monday:

    On Taking Notes;

    On thesis statements (see below);

    UPCOMING DUE DATES:

    • Thesis statements due next Monday, April 2;
    • Books and reading logs to be finished by next Friday, April 6;

    Tuesday:

    HERE IS A DECENT, ONE-PAGE DESCRIPTION of thesis statements, and includes writing a thesis about nonfiction. 

    Reading journal check #1: have your journals to turn in today; you will get them back. I want to check your progress on them. I will check them later this week if there is time, and again a few times next week. Journals (and your books) are due FINISHED next Friday.

    Wednesday:

    >Vocabulary quiz / new vocabulary

    Thursday:

    >See Google Classroom for assignment -- note that you need to find magazine or newspaper article, not just some random internet article. Read the instructions on Google Classroom, reading the article, and fill out the Google Form accordingly. This is due today in class.

    Friday:

    >

    ==================================================================================


  • 8 April - 14 April

    MONDAY / TUESDAY -- BLOCK SCHEDULE:

    >Thesis statements due today: 

    • Monday: periods 1, 2, 3
    • Tuesday: periods 4, 5, 6 

    >Books should be finished by the end of the week.

    >Google Form (at Google Classroom): Fill in the form with your name and thesis statement;

    >Notes on sources -- 2 powerpoints and 1 "Website Evaluation Worksheet" -- the worksheet does NOT have to be done, but is there for you as a checklist when considering the usefulness of your internet sources; NOTES are and worksheet are posted below;

    >Research notes: Fill in the form on Google Classroom beginning your research. Put the URLs in and take notes on the information the article gives you. THREE articles are required. Assignment is due at 11:59 PM today, so what you don't finish in class is homework for tonight.

    WEDNESDAY -- FLEX SCHEDULE:

    Vocabulary quiz / new vocabulary;

    >

    THURSDAY / FRIDAY -- BLOCK SCHEDULE:

    >Books and reading logs finished by today!

    >Read thesis statements here:



    ==================================================================================